Rejections at destination are inevitable, and the issues surrounding them are never pleasant. So you need to be prepared to take the emotion out of the situation, have your product moved in a timely manner and have it sold for the account of whom it may concern to maximize the return and protect your rights for filing a future claim with complete documentation.

Bryan Nickerson

Here at Western Growers Trade Practices, we encourage shippers to embrace a culture of best practices by putting in place every day procedures and protocols. As part of that mantra, we preach to document, document, and document. As a shipper, we know you strive every day to fulfill your customers’ expectations, on every sales transaction. Because occasional disputes at destination can arise on a perishable sales transaction, most of those contested matters have at the center of the issue, a question related to pulp temperatures at origin, in-transit temperatures, or at destination.

Bryan Nickerson

By only taking a quick cursory review of the USDA inspection, a shipper may miss the full story as to whether there was an actual breach of contract (failure to meet good delivery). You must remember that a USDA certificate may in most circumstances reflect that the commodity failed to grade U.S. No. 1, but that does not mean the shipper failed to meet the terms of the negotiated sales contract under a “NO GRADE CONTRACT”.

Bryan Nickerson

Along with a New Year comes a crucial time of the year to be reminded of leafy greens (iceberg and romaine) exposure to possible freeze conditions in the field. Just last week, USDA Market News reported start of daily harvest curtailed by ice in the fields in the desert southwest lettuce growing regions. The low temperature readings could very well result in field-freeze damage to iceberg, romaine lettuce and other leafy greens.

Bryan Nickerson

Are you prepared when there are unexpected shortfalls of available produce you have contracted and agreed to ship to your customer? Whether it is a short-term ad commitment or an extended vendor agreement for a routine quantity of produce to be shipped, it is important to know your obligations and, more importantly, how you and your customer will handle any potential shortfall of supply. If you do not plan for such a contingency, you could expose yourself to potential liability for a failure to ship.

Bryan Nickerson

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Produce Insights

Stay up to date with best practices for selling and shipping fresh produce with our insider blog. Produce Insights offers expert guidance on all things related to PACA, product arrival issues, product guarantees, collections on slow pay, disputed contracts and so much more.

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