Flowing Out to Sea
Billions of Gallons We Desperately Need

El Niño brought major rain and snow to California. But most of it is has gone straight out to the ocean. Why are we missing this opportunity to recover from the drought?

El Niño is Gone
Why Didn't it Make a Difference?

75% of the state – 29 million people and nearly 5 million acres of farmland in Central and Southern California – depend on water that falls as snow and rain in Northern California. This water flows into rivers that come together in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where some is captured and stored for cities and farms in the central and southern regions of the state. Most of this water, however, isn’t captured and stored. It runs out to sea under the Golden Gate Bridge.

This year, El Niño storms delivered millions of acre feet of precious water, swelling the rivers and the Delta. But most of it has already been lost to the sea. Watch this video to find out why this year’s potential drought-buster may go down in history as The Lost El Niño.

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Get involved in the conversation by sharing this video with your friends on Facebook. Or share your thoughts on Twitter using or

Don’t know what to Tweet? Try these talking points: 175% of our state depends on water that flows through the Delta (29 million people and 5 million acres of farmland) 2Every day, we are losing three billion gallons of water to the ocean due to environmental restrictions to protect fish 3This is water that could be pumped and stored to help us recover from the drought 4We need Congress to pass legislation that allows us to capture more El Niño rains without changing the Endangered Species Act 5Other stressors—not the pumps! —are leading to Delta smelt, salmon decline

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Act Now!

Don’t know what to Tweet? Try these talking points: 175% of our state depends on water that flows through the Delta (29 million people and 5 million acres of farmland) 2Every day, we are losing three billion gallons of water to the ocean due to environmental restrictions to protect fish 3This is water that could be pumped and stored to help us recover from the drought 4We need Congress to pass legislation that allows us to capture more El Niño rains without changing the Endangered Species Act 5We must not allow this year to be remembered as the Lost El Niño

This infographic shows the impact the drought has had on the agricultural industry in California in 2015.

This infographic shows the counties where water is supplied versus needed in California.

Statement by Western Growers President and CEO Tom Nassif regarding Senator Dianne Feinstein’s call for increased pumping to capture the water from recent El Niño storms.

President & CEO of Western Growers, Tom Nassif, opines about the unrealistic wants of both Democrats and Republicans which is keeping them from moving forward on legislation for immigration reform and a solution to California's water supply.

This statement provided by President & CEO of Western Growers, Tom Nassif, calls for immediate action to improve California's drought in light of upcoming El Niño storms.

In light of the strengthening El Niño weather pattern, Western Growers delivered a letter to Governor Brown calling on his Administration to “capture as much precipitation as our infrastructure will allow.”

This statement provided by President & CEO of Western Growers, Tom Nassif, urges the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to act on Western drought legislation prior to the Thanksgiving recess.

President & CEO of Western Growers, Tom Nassif, shares his outlook for California farmers if the state isn't able to capture the benefits of El Niño with new legislation.

This statement provided by President & CEO of Western Growers, Tom Nassif, praises Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer for introducing the California Emergency Drought Relief Act of 2015.

This statement provided by President & CEO of Western Growers, Tom Nassif, commends the passage of the Western Water and American Food Security Act of 2015 by the U.S. House of Representatives.